Really Cool Women\'s Book Club

Mrs. Sherlock Holmes by Brad Ricca on April 13th, 2017 at JoLynne’s house April 7, 2017

Filed under: Upcoming books, dates and places — Susan @ 10:49 pm

In Mrs. Sherlock Holmes, Brad Ricca paints the picture of Grace Humiston, a soft-spoken yet persistent woman investigator determined to solve the disappearance of an 18-year-oldgirl―this in the midst of both the suffragist and white-slavery movements. Where the police leave off, Humiston, undaunted by naysayers, picks up clues and doggedly follows them. Ricca lays out this fascinating whodunit with a novelist’s skill, making Mrs. Sherlock Holmes a suspenseful winner.

 

Subject 375 by Nikki Owen at Karen’s house on March 2nd, 2017 January 31, 2017

Filed under: Upcoming books, dates and places — Susan @ 5:48 pm

41bgtzd4ql-_sx296_bo1204203200_Plastic surgeon Dr. Maria Martinez has Asperger’s. Convicted of killing a priest, she is alone in prison and has no memory of the murder. DNA evidence places Maria at the scene of the crime, yet she claims she’s innocent. Then she starts to remember …

 

Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance on January 19th at Lori’s house January 19, 2017

Filed under: Upcoming books, dates and places — Susan @ 4:29 pm

6ffd8a12-78a6-4513-9324-54a6e761ee77-762-00000125914c9700_tmpFrom a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, a probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class through the author’s own story of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town.

Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of poor, white Americans. The disintegration of this group, a process that has been slowly occurring now for over forty years, has been reported with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. In HillbillyElegy, J.D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hanging around your neck.

The Vance family story began with hope in postwar America. J.D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually one of their grandchildren would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of success in achieving generational upward mobility. But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that J.D.’s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, never fully escaping the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. With piercing honesty, Vance shows how he himself still carries around the demons of his chaotic family history.

A deeply moving memoir, with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.

 

A Thousand Naked Strangers by Kevin Hazard on October 27th at Danda’s house October 17, 2016

Filed under: Upcoming books, dates and places — Susan @ 9:28 pm

51ghevu2qpl-_sx326_bo1204203200_A former paramedic’s visceral, poignant, and mordantly funny account of a decade spent on Atlanta’s mean streets saving lives and connecting with the drama and occasional beauty that lies inside catastrophe.

In the aftermath of 9/11 Kevin Hazzard felt that something was missing from his life—his days were too safe, too routine. A failed salesman turned local reporter, he wanted to test himself, see how he might respond to pressure and danger. He signed up for emergency medical training and became, at age twenty-six, a newly minted EMT running calls in the worst sections of Atlanta. His life entered a different realm—one of blood, violence, and amazing grace.

Thoroughly intimidated at first and frequently terrified, he experienced on a nightly basis the adrenaline rush of walking into chaos. But in his downtime, Kevin reflected on how people’s facades drop away when catastrophe strikes. As his hours on the job piled up, he realized he was beginning to see into the truth of things. There is no pretense five beats into a chest compression, or in an alley next to a crack den, or on a dimly lit highway where cars have collided. Eventually, what had at first seemed impossible happened: Kevin acquired mastery. And in the process he was able to discern the professional differences between his freewheeling peers, what marked each—as he termed them—as “a tourist,” “true believer,” or “killer.”

Combining indelible scenes that remind us of life’s fragile beauty with laugh-out-loud moments that keep us smiling through the worst, A Thousand Naked Strangers is an absorbing read about one man’s journey of self-discovery—a trip that also teaches us about ourselves.

 

Books, Dates and Places February 12, 2016

Filed under: Upcoming books, dates and places — Susan @ 5:29 pm

The votes are in and here are the results along with where and when.

 

The Forever War – Dexter Filkins at Karen’s house on March 31st, 2016

Hot, Flat and Crowded by Thomas Friedman at JoLynne’s house on May 12th, 2016

 

The Year of Living Biblically by AJ Jacobs at Ann’s house on June 23rd

 

 

2015 Spring Books and Places February 3, 2015

Filed under: Upcoming books, dates and places — Susan @ 7:06 pm

The Ghost Map: The Story of London’s Most Terrifying Epidemic–and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World by Steven Johnson on March 12th at Lori’s house

The Birth of the Pill by Jonathan Eig on April 23rd at Karen’s house

Being Mortal:  Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande on June 4th at JoLynne’s house