Really Cool Women\'s Book Club

Hag-Seed by Margaret Atwood on July 19th at Susan’s house June 15, 2018

Filed under: Upcoming books, dates and places — Susan @ 10:16 pm

William Shakespeare’s The Tempest retold as Hag-Seed

Felix is at the top of his game as Artistic Director of the Makeshiweg Theatre Festival. His productions have amazed and confounded. Now he’s staging a Tempest like no other: not only will it boost his reputation, it will heal emotional wounds.

Or that was the plan. Instead, after an act of unforeseen treachery, Felix is living in exile in a backwoods hovel, haunted by memories of his beloved lost daughter, Miranda. And also brewing revenge.

After twelve years, revenge finally arrives in the shape of a theatre course at a nearby prison. Here, Felix and his inmate actors will put on his Tempest and snare the traitors who destroyed him. It’s magic! But will it remake Felix as his enemies fall?

Margaret Atwood’s novel take on Shakespeare’s play of enchantment, retribution, and second chances leads us on an interactive, illusion-ridden journey filled with new surprises and wonders of its own.

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You don’t have to say you love me by Sherman Alexie on March 15th at JoLynne’s house February 12, 2018

Filed under: Upcoming books, dates and places — Susan @ 10:26 pm

Sherman Alexie’s memoir, You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me, is an extraordinary look at the complicated relationship between a remarkable mother and an equally remarkable son, set, mostly, in the Spokane Indian Reservation where Alexie spent his childhood. His whip-smart, sometimes cruel mother saved the family when she stopped drinking, but was inexplicably tough on her kids – something Alexie traces back to mental illness, sexual assault, and the Indian experience of violence and oppression. Family memoirs often seem like an opportunity for score settling, but Alexie is so aware of his own fallible memory and his own imperfections that this one won’t make you bristle. His style is idiosyncratic – passages of verse lead to passages of prose — but it’s readable, unpretentious, funny and deeply compassionate.

 

Dispatches by Michael Herr on November 9th at 6:30 at Big Grove hosted by Heidi November 8, 2017

Filed under: Upcoming books, dates and places — Susan @ 4:05 pm

From its terrifying opening pages to its final eloquent words, Dispatches makes us see, in unforgettable and unflinching detail, the chaos and fervor of the war and the surreal insanity of life in that singular combat zone. Michael Herr’s unsparing, unorthodox retellings of the day-to-day events in Vietnam take on the force of poetry, rendering clarity from one of the most incomprehensible and nightmarish events of our time.

Dispatches is among the most blistering and compassionate accounts of war in our literature.

 

Upcoming books and places July 6, 2017

Filed under: Upcoming books, dates and places — Susan @ 6:43 pm

All the light we cannot see by Anthony Doerr on August 17th at Susan’s house

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates on September 28th at Danda’s house

Dispatches by Michael Herr on November 9th at Heidi’s house

 

Mrs. Sherlock Holmes by Brad Ricca on April 13th, 2017 at JoLynne’s house April 7, 2017

Filed under: Upcoming books, dates and places — Susan @ 10:49 pm

In Mrs. Sherlock Holmes, Brad Ricca paints the picture of Grace Humiston, a soft-spoken yet persistent woman investigator determined to solve the disappearance of an 18-year-oldgirl―this in the midst of both the suffragist and white-slavery movements. Where the police leave off, Humiston, undaunted by naysayers, picks up clues and doggedly follows them. Ricca lays out this fascinating whodunit with a novelist’s skill, making Mrs. Sherlock Holmes a suspenseful winner.

 

Subject 375 by Nikki Owen at Karen’s house on March 2nd, 2017 January 31, 2017

Filed under: Upcoming books, dates and places — Susan @ 5:48 pm

41bgtzd4ql-_sx296_bo1204203200_Plastic surgeon Dr. Maria Martinez has Asperger’s. Convicted of killing a priest, she is alone in prison and has no memory of the murder. DNA evidence places Maria at the scene of the crime, yet she claims she’s innocent. Then she starts to remember …

 

Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance on January 19th at Lori’s house January 19, 2017

Filed under: Upcoming books, dates and places — Susan @ 4:29 pm

6ffd8a12-78a6-4513-9324-54a6e761ee77-762-00000125914c9700_tmpFrom a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, a probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class through the author’s own story of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town.

Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of poor, white Americans. The disintegration of this group, a process that has been slowly occurring now for over forty years, has been reported with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. In HillbillyElegy, J.D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hanging around your neck.

The Vance family story began with hope in postwar America. J.D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually one of their grandchildren would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of success in achieving generational upward mobility. But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that J.D.’s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, never fully escaping the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. With piercing honesty, Vance shows how he himself still carries around the demons of his chaotic family history.

A deeply moving memoir, with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.