Really Cool Women\'s Book Club

Bridge of Sighs by Richard Russo at Susan E’s house on March 4th January 30, 2009

Filed under: Books — Susan @ 4:47 pm

book-of-sighsFrom Publishers Weekly
SignatureReviewed by Jeffrey FrankRichard Russo’s portraits of smalltown life may be read not only as fine novels but as invaluable guides to the economic decline of the American Northeast. Russo was reared in Gloversville, N.Y. (which got its name from the gloves no longer manufactured there), and a lot of mid–20th-century Gloversville can be found in his earlier fiction (Mohawk; The Risk Pool). It reappears in Bridge of Sighs, Russo’s splendid chronicle of life in the hollowed-out town of Thomaston, N.Y., where a tannery’s runoff is slowly spreading carcinogenic ruin.At the novel’s center is Lou C. Lynch (his middle initial wins him the unfortunate, lasting nickname Lucy), but the narrative, which covers more than a half-century, also unfolds through the eyes of Lou’s somewhat distant and tormented friend, Bobby Marconi, as well as Sarah Berg, a gifted artist who Lou marries and who loves Bobby, too. The lives of the Lynches, the Bergs and the Marconis intersect in various ways, few of them happy; each family has its share of woe. Lou’s father, a genial milkman, is bound for obsolescence and leads his wife into a life of shopkeeping; Bobby’s family is being damaged by an abusive father. Sarah moves between two parents: a schoolteacher father with grandiose literary dreams and a scandal in his past and a mother who lives in Long Island and leads a life that is far from exemplary. Russo weaves all of this together with great sureness, expertly planting clues—and explosives, too—knowing just when and how they will be discovered or detonate at the proper time. Incidents from youth—a savage beating, a misunderstood homosexual advance, a loveless seduction—have repercussions that last far into adulthood. Thomaston itself becomes a sort of extended family, whose unhappy members include the owners of the tannery who eventually face ruin.Bridge of Sighs is a melancholy book; the title refers to a painting that Bobby is making (he becomes a celebrated artist) and the Venetian landmark, but also to the sadness that pervades even the most contented lives. Lou, writing about himself and his dying, blue-collar town, thinks that the loss of a place isn’t really so different from the loss of a person. Both disappear without permission, leaving the self diminished, in need of testimony and evidence. If there are false notes, they come with Russo’s portrayal of African-Americans, who too often speak like stock characters: (Doan be given me that hairy eyeball like you doan believe, ’cause I know better, says one). But Russo has a deep and real understanding of stifled ambitions and the secrets people keep, sometimes forever. Bridge of Sighs, on every page, is largehearted, vividly populated and filled with life from America’s recent, still vanishing past.

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January 21st, 2009-Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf at Ann’s House

Filed under: Past Meetings — Susan @ 4:33 pm

Cool Women in Attendance:  Marci, Ann, Susan C, Lori, Heidi

Menu:  Calzones, salad and lots of wine!  Chocolate Chip cookies for desert 🙂

Memorable Moments:

  • The book was challenging (no one actually finished it except Heidi) Marci pointed out that although the book was written in 1925 – Virginia Woolf refrenced Einstein – who at that time was barely known – and we talked some about the Bloomsbury group E.M. Forster, John Maynard Keynes (Economist) Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell (Artist) Duncan Grant (Artist) Clive Bell (Art Critic) to name only a few. And that it would be fun to do a literary tour. 
  • Susan’s contemplating a big move! Possibly to Colorado or Texas…either that or she’s going to completely re-make the Parkland Nursing program…one way or the winds of change are blowing
  • Loved Michelle Obama’s Lemongrass outfit and lime green shoes and gloves!
 

Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf on January 21st, 2009 at Anne’s house January 2, 2009

Filed under: Books — Susan @ 2:26 pm

mrsdalloway1Amazon.com Review
As Clarissa Dalloway walks through London on a fine June morning, a sky-writing plane captures her attention. Crowds stare upwards to decipher the message while the plane turns and loops, leaving off one letter, picking up another. Like the airplane’s swooping path, Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway follows Clarissa and those whose lives brush hers–from Peter Walsh, whom she spurned years ago, to her daughter Elizabeth, the girl’s angry teacher, Doris Kilman, and war-shocked Septimus Warren Smith, who is sinking into madness.

As Mrs. Dalloway prepares for the party she is giving that evening, a series of events intrudes on her composure. Her husband is invited, without her, to lunch with Lady Bruton (who, Clarissa notes anxiously, gives the most amusing luncheons). Meanwhile, Peter Walsh appears, recently from India, to criticize and confide in her. His sudden arrival evokes memories of a distant past, the choices she made then, and her wistful friendship with Sally Seton.

Woolf then explores the relationships between women and men, and between women, as Clarissa muses, “It was something central which permeated; something warm which broke up surfaces and rippled the cold contact of man and woman, or of women together…. Her relation in the old days with Sally Seton. Had not that, after all, been love?” While Clarissa is transported to past afternoons with Sally, and as she sits mending her green dress, Warren Smith catapults desperately into his delusions. Although his troubles form a tangent to Clarissa’s web, they undeniably touch it, and the strands connecting all these characters draw tighter as evening deepens. As she immerses us in each inner life, Virginia Woolf offers exquisite, painful images of the past bleeding into the present, of desire overwhelmed by society’s demands.